World Building – Part 2

So, I’ve written about this before, here to be precise.  Last time I started with the words, world building is hard.

In retrospect this was inaccurate, it isn’t hard, it’s challenging.  There’s whole world of difference between the two of those, because as it turns out I quite enjoy world building, it’s exceedingly rewarding.  I never knew deciding on how the passage of time works and working on religions could be so interesting, but then seeing it leads to whole load of reading I should have known really.

I think the problem was that I didn’t totally have the themes of the world set in my head, I knew what they were, they just weren’t organised.  After some organisation, I have managed to get some key things sorted.  I have now decided that time will pass at the same rate as the real world and have worked out that the city the first story is set in will be an atheist state.  Next, I need to address language, does everyone speak the same language or will that differ from one nation to the other?  If they do speak different then how am I going to represent this since I only know my mother tongue?

At one time, I might have considered this too daunting a challenge to tackle and looked for an easy way out.  These days I can’t wait to take the challenge on.

Exciting times my friends.

Forgotten History

On November 6th 1865, a warship flying the flag of a foreign power sailed up the River Mersey and brought itself up alongside the British man-of-war, HMS Donegal.

Usually back in those days that was the sign that a great deal of violence and death was about to ensue as the two ships started attempting to pummel each other into submission.  But on this occasion, nothing of the kind occurred.  The ship was the CSS Shenandoah, a warship of the now defunct Confederate States of America and her captain had no greater intention than to surrender his ship to the British authorities.  It was the last act of a continent spanning civil war, fought thousands of miles away on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in the deaths of over 620,000 American servicemen.

I’m not going to go into the strange quirk of fate that led to this nation defining war ending mid river of the River Mersey, that’s not the point of my post today.  The point of my post is this, until the other day I wasn’t aware of this.  Maybe everyone reading this knew the last combatants in the American Civil War surrendered ten miles upriver from where I live, but I didn’t.  It got me to wondering how many moments of historical significance have occurred right on our doorstep, things that have been forgotten to slow march of time.

So, keep an eye out when you’re out and about, who knows what little quirks of history you’ll spot.